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Should Lectures Be Given During Face-to-Face Class Time?

i Jackie Gerstein
Category: Others
Date: 19/07/2012
Tags: educational reform, flipped classroom, lectures
?

There has been some debate about the effectiveness of using lectures during classtime.  Some articles and blogs about this topic can be found at http://www.mentormob.com/learn/i/lectures-in-the-classroom

posted by Jackie Gerstein | suggest edit

Yes

Lectures should be a regular part of face-to-face class time.

No

Lectures should rarely be used during face-to-face class time.

DEBATE

add your argumensts in favor or against the issue

arguments supporting the issue
arguments against the issue

Often times I have students participate in my lecture, having them come up and demonstrate what I've been discussing so lectures can be more meaningful.

posted by Nancy Toll | suggest edit

0 likes 

I am in a unique position in that I teach in a computer lab. I am reinventing my entire delivery model by creating mini-modules of instruction using Camtasia which will be housed in an Edmodo classroom. Students will watch the instructions and then attemp the performance task. There will also be printed instructions, and, for some, direct (person to person) instruction.

posted by Kevin Jarrett | suggest edit

1 likes 

I'm in favor of short lecture segments because it is an opportunity for the teacher to share their personal enthusiasm in the material and tell anecdotes.

posted by Molly Trzebiatowski | suggest edit

6 likes 

There are many tools available to gather student feedback during a lecture now including back-channel chats and polling devices and software. This gives students a chance to be a part of a lecture.

posted by Nancy Toll | suggest edit

1 likes 

They are going to be doing this on Chromebook laptops. Oh, I teach K-4. Pretty sure this is a no-brainer in 2-3-4. K and 1st will be another story. Literacy is going to be a challenge,

posted by Kevin Jarrett | suggest edit

0 likes 

Integrating student use of technology during a lecture can be motivating for students.

posted by Nancy Toll | suggest edit

0 likes 

I want to second Molly's arguement that short lectures give teachers an opportunity to share their personal stories and enthusiasm which makes teaching much more fun for the teacher - have to keep teachers motivated too.

posted by Nancy Toll | suggest edit

0 likes 

This gives teachers a chance to share and express their passions.

posted by Nancy Toll | suggest edit

0 likes 

If I didn't lecture in class (and I use that term loosely as I prefer more of a dialogue than a monologue) I feel like I'd miss out on the ability to see and hear feedback from the students. If I'm in the middle of presenting a lesson and see blank looks (or a lot of hands raised) I know I need to go about the material a different way. I wouldn't know that through having the kids watch a video every night.

posted by Kristen Brennan Fouss | suggest edit

4 likes 

The art of rhetoric has been apart of the human learning tradition for thousands of years. If a lecture is boring that is the fault of the teacher not the method of learning; the messenger not medium.

posted by Brad Blakeley | suggest edit

7 likes 

Lectures can vary in length. I do not believe that a lecture should ever exceed 20 minutes. Lectures should be used as part of an overall strategy that emphasizes a wide variety of creative approaches. This way, students are able to benefit from a multifaceted strategy that INCLUDES a section from an expert who understands his school's specific curriculum, not a broad lecture from some "expert" who Skypes in. Further, a teacher can evaluate his students' progress and receive direct feedback.

posted by Trevor Cartwright | suggest edit

1 likes 

I think there is still some room for lectures in the classroom, but as this quote states, "...The role of lectures in today's world is not to deliver content but to inspire, tell stories, and push ideas to make the students want to go out and learn stuff on their own!"

posted by Collette Morris | suggest edit

1 likes 

I believe interactive lecturing is efficient. If for example the "PowerPoint being used as a visual aid, with many photos and illustrations, but few words, students will find the slides more engaging and listen to the lecture rather than tune it out."

posted by racheloles | suggest edit

1 likes 

I discussed this topic in a blog post, Who Would Choose a Lecture as Their Primary Mode of Learning? http://usergeneratededucation.wordpress.com/2012/07/12/who-would-choose-a-lecture-as-their-primary-mode-of-learning/

posted by Jackie Gerstein | suggest edit

1 likes 

I'm not sure teachers are prepared for losing the lecture. This months issue of Learning and Leading with Technology has an article the Flipped Classroom and states that teachers can do it in a variety of ways with different degrees of adoption from just a few session to a complete reconceptualization of a course. Using this graduated attempt at flipping would allow for the learning curve and gathering of resources needed to flip.

posted by DonnaB | suggest edit

2 likes 

Unless one is an expert "entertainer," trying to keep the attention and interest of a class is near impossible. This brings to mind Ferris Bueller's Day Off when Ben Stein was trying to explain Quantum Physics, and you look out and see the student drooling on the desk...I was hilarious but sadly true.

posted by Rosemary Seitel | suggest edit

3 likes 

Lecturing has a place in the classroom setting but should not monopolize the entire class session. With the variety of learning styles in a classroom, different teaching methods should be utilized.

posted by MrsTFoster | suggest edit

3 likes 

As a math teacher, there is a time and a place for lecture. When I "lecture" it's not the traditional standing up there and talking without any interaction. I ask LOTS of questions and have students work individually or in groups to come up with answers to questions.

posted by hekblad | suggest edit

2 likes 

Before we had books or internet, lecturing was the way for people to learn. The word lecture is a latin word that means "to read". We need to engage the students and lecturing is not the only way to do this. Many students are passive learners with teachers who lecture.

posted by bwallerick | suggest edit

2 likes 

Let kids go find the content….what we need to use the lecture for is to inspire them to go learn the content, create understanding, and apply that new knowledge to other areas. http://www.thethinkingstick.com/lecture-as-content-delivery-is-dead/

posted by Derek Krallman | suggest edit

0 likes 

While I do believe that there is a place for lecture, students today are exposed to the internet/media that is at their fingertips. If we expect our students to "want" to learn, we need to provide them with an exciting teaching style that they have now become accustomed to.

posted by Mickey | suggest edit

1 likes 

With interactive learning techniques the lecture would be guided by the questions that learning experience would generate.

posted by Tina Rodilosso | suggest edit

1 likes 

Discuss

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I took the supporting view but really feel merits to both methodologies depending on how they are presented. Both can be done well and both can be done poorly.

Posted by Nancy Toll on 24/07/2012 at 07:06 PM

0 likes  Reply

 

Bringing an "expert" in the room via tube, Skype, UnitedStreaming, Ted, or iTunes U. Marzano sates, "insufficient background knowledge is a chronic cause of low achievement." The power of the "image " often used by lecturers in the above mentioned delivery formats provokes thinking, allows one to connect beyond the literal interpretation of the word and leads one to wonder or to make sense of a concept. Beyond those connections the learner may linger, replay and otherwise spend endless amounts of time forming new understandings, gaining clarity and/or learning a new skill. If a teacher were to provide a number of video lectures from which to choose, the student becomes the driver, empowered by the control over the selection and by inserting in his/her learning cycle. The traditional stand and deliver lecture also has its place. The "lecturer" must not only study the content but the delivery style. For in truth, the delivery and timing is key to its impact. This is the entry I posted earlier today.

Posted by Rosemary Seitel on 24/07/2012 at 06:59 PM

0 likes  Reply

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